Tag Archives: horror movie reviews

Rewind Review: 2011’s ‘Crawl’

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Crawl is an ultra slow-burn Home Invasion Horror written and directed by Paul China and produced by his twin brother Benjamin.  The sibling relationship inspires a knee-jerk comparison to the Cohen Brothers, but the comparison goes way beyond the surface.  One of the first things I noticed about Crawl was it’s resemblance to Fargo and No Country for Old Men; then I come to discover that the China Brothers had cast members watch Blood Simple in preparation for filming.

Check out my review after the jump.

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Rewind Review: 2011’s ‘The Day’

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The Day, directed by Douglas Aarniokoski and written by Luke Passmore, is a taut post-apocalyptic Horror with a twist on the Home Invasion subgenre–and cannibals.

Check out my review after the jump.

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Rewind Review: 2007’s ‘The Devil’s Chair’

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Nick West: “Hi there. I’m Nick West. I’m medicated, how are you?”

The Devil’s Chair, written and directed Adam Mason, is a potent, self-aware mix of campy Bubblegum and grotesque Body Horror with a 3rd Act that will fuck you up emotionally.  The script, which often employs a first-person narrator, is blisteringly satirical and witty as hell.

Check out my review after the jump.

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Rewind Review: 2012’s ‘Citadel’

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Every once in a while, a filmmaker can turn an intensely personal experience into something with near universal resonance.  When he was 18 years old, Ciaran Foy was attacked by a group of young hoodlums who threatened him with a dirty syring before attacking him; he wasn’t even robbed–violence itself seemed to be the only motivation.  The experience left Foy traumatized and suffering from agoraphobia for years after.  Eventually, he was able to channel his emotions into creating a movie that would help him come to terms with this attack and, hopefully, overcome his fears.  The result, his debut Citadel, is a film that tackles many complicated issues surrounding youth violence, as well as the innate fears that come with being a new parent.  While evil/feral children have their own subgenre, Citadel may be the first in a new and somewhat controversial genre category: Hoodie Horror.

Check out my review after the jump.

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Rewind Review: 2002’s ‘Dog Soldiers’

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Megan:  “Up until today you believed there was a line between myth and reality. Maybe a very fine line sometimes but at least there was a line. Those things out there are REAL. If they’re real, what else is real? You know what lives in the shadows now. You may never get another night’s sleep as long as you live.”

Neil Marshall became huge in Horror circles as the writer/director of The Decent in 2005 (definitely one of the 10 best Horror films of the 21st Century to date), but his previous Creature Feature, Dog Soldiers, is extremely impressive as well.  Dog Soldiers along with the film Ginger Snaps were both released right around the turn of the century, and both radically redefined/subverted standard werewolf mythologies–albeit in very different ways.  Ginger Snaps was a uniquely feminized spin on the classic lycanthrope troupe becoming a metaphor for puberty and menstruation.  Dog Soldier, on the other hand, explores the potential weaponization of werewolves, a theme that will later become a staple of the Underworld Franchise.

Check out my review after the jump.

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Rewind Review: 2005’s ‘The Haunting of #24’

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Old Woman: “Do you understand?  They’re dead–and they’re hungry.  It’s as simple as that.”

The Haunting of #24 (also know as Lie Still) is an old-school supernatural/haunted-house Horror movie.  It’s a taught modern Gothic soaked in human suffering, where one man’s emotional breakdown coincides with terrifying paranormal events.  It’s a struggle not merely for his life–but for his soul.

heck out my review after the jump.

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Review: ‘Armistice’

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Armistice (originally called Warhouse) is a slow burn metaphysical/psychological Horror movie that requires a certain amount of patience.  It’s basically a one-man show; everything hinges on Joseph Morgan‘s portrayal of Royal Marines Commando A.J. Budd–and it’s a difficult role to say the least.

Check out my review after the jump.

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Rewind Review: 2011’s ‘The Bleeding House’

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The Bleeding House is a unique Home-Invasion Horror movie with slasher elements.  It’s a moody, understated film with an almost literary quality, reminding this blogger of Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been by Joyce Carol Oates and John Steinbeck’s The Chrysanthemums.

Check out my review after the jump.

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Rewind Review: 2012’s ‘Bait 3D’

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Josh (Xavier Samuel) is a sad guy having a really REALLY bad day.  He wakes up late and hurries off to his menial job stocking shelves in a supermarket.  When he gets to work, he runs into his ex-fiancé who broke his heart a year ago–and she’s with her new boyfriend.  Then his boss comes along and chews him out for being late and looking like shit.  While this is going on, a couple armed robbers have infiltrated the establishment intent on a big pay day; this quickly escalates into a deadly hostage situation.  Pretty rough morning, am I right?  Just wait… In the midst of this chaos, the entire coast is rocked by a major earthquake that sets buildings buckling.  Before the dust can settle, a huge Tsunami sweeps across town, flooding the supermarket and trapping survivors inside.  It’s obvious that a small aftershock is all it will take to destroy the building completely killing everyone else, so escape is paramount.  As if the situation couldn’t possibly be any more dire, it just so happens that a couple great white sharks have been dislocated by the tidal wave and are now swimming around the flooded isles–and they’re extremely hungry.  It’s a bad case of the Mondays to say the least!

Bait 3D is an Australian disaster Horror that ups the ante in the Killer Shark(s) subgenre.

Check out my review after the jump.

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Rewind Review: 2010’s ‘Vanishing on 7th Street’

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Vanishing on 7th Street is a complicated mix of metaphysical, psychological, and apocalyptic Horror directed by Brad Anderson (Session 9, The Machinist, Transsiberian).  It stars Hayden Christensen (Star Wars, Jumper), Thandie Newton (Retreat, The Chronicles of Riddick), and John Leguizamo (Spawn, Land of the Dead).

Per Wikipedia: “The movie was initially released for Zune and Xbox Live members prior to its theatrical release. Shown in only six theaters across the United States, Vanishing on 7th Street was a total theatrical flop. The film grossed $22,197, roughly 1/450 of its estimated budget of $10 Million.  However, it made $1,045,953 outside of the United States, with over a quarter of this total coming from South Korea.” Go figure.

Check out my review after the jump.

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